Navigation Team Sweeps Ravenna Woods Encampment Despite Activist Barrier

A sign erected by encampment members at their main entrance. Photo by Kelsey Hamlin

Along a muddy path next to a section of the Burke Gilman trail in Ravenna, 25 activists joined the residents of a homeless encampment Wednesday hoping to halt a sweep. When the Navigation Team’s outreach group arrived, they were surprised to see a band of activists with linked arms acting as a human barrier to vehicles. The outreach notified the rest of their not-yet-arrived team, which then called for SPD back-up. Two more police vehicles arrived, but there was no physical confrontation and no arrests.

Activists rotated through the encampment to provide a presence during the sweep. A few discussed the oddity of Seattle Police Department’s (SPD’s) Navigation Team uniforms. Everything was normal except one item: a Blue Lives Matter patch with “NAV” at the bottom left.

via South Seattle Emerald

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After Tommy Le shooting, King County sheriff introduces new, less lethal weapons and policies

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Tommy Le’s uncle makes a speech for Tommy on the Public Forum on July 19, 2017 .• Photo by Cathy You

It’s been almost a year since Tommy Le was fatally shot by two members of the King County Sheriff’s Office (KCSO), and the KCSO falsely told the media and Le’s family that he held a knife during the confrontation. It’s been not much more than 100 days since the KCSO had a change in staff.

A number of Asian Pacific Islander (API) community members feel optimistic while others feel hesitant about upcoming changes under the newly elected sheriff, Mitzi Johanknecht.

Via International Examiner

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Public Defender’s Office to Help Mitigate Unintended Impacts of Low Level Crimes

Seattle City Council member Lisa Herbold, who spearheaded the program’s implementation. Photo courtesy of Seattle City Council

Seattle City Council passed Resolution 31802 Monday to insert civil “collateral consequence” attorneys into the King County Department of Public Defense (KC DPD) in an effort to inform people charged with crimes about the unintended consequences of conviction.

via South Seattle Emerald

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In Seattle, domestic workers don’t have the same protections as others—but that could change

Domestic workers, some members of Working Washington, SEIU 775, or Casa Latina, set up tiny house displays outside City Hall made from gloves and diapers. Photo by Kelsey Hamlin

In a study of 174 Seattle-area caretakers, house cleaners, and gardeners, local labor rights organization Working Washington found that local domestic workers are presented with similar struggles to those in other states and countries: They perform a high-risk job with few workplace protections.

85 percent of Seattle domestic workers, according to the study, would not be covered for an on-the-job injury. 54 percent don’t have health insurance—and only 6 percent get it from their employers. Domestic workers, including those in Seattle, are often at a higher risk for workplace violations, like sexual harassment and wage theft.

Via Curbed – Seattle Continue reading

One Year After First Proposal, Micro Business Owners Weigh Impact of Sugar Tax

South End and Central District community members and small business owners gathered Monday to discuss their personal experiences with Seattle’s so-called “soda tax.”

The soda tax, also commonly known as the sugar tax, was originally brought forward by Seattle’s previous Mayor Ed Murray. The tax originated in part out of a response to America’s “obesity epidemic” and to raise approximately $16 million a year for education, specifically to close racial disparities. As it turns out, this tax may be exacerbating disparities in other areas.Jim Desler, the spokesman for Keep Seattle Livable for All Coalition — which formed last year after rumors of the sugar tax first emerged — cited that grocery items are already above 25 percent the national average in Seattle.

via South Seattle Emerald

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