Some major life changes

Hey all,

so if you haven’t seen it on my social yet, I lost my job as Capitol Hill Seattle Blog’s reporter. This means I’m out on money around the holidays while paying Seattle rent. It’s also a testament to the state of community journalism.

I severely need your support to keep doing what I love. Anything at all helps. I’ve created a Patreon account to support my work as I go back to freelancing. (Every Seattle publication pays under $100 per article if you’re unfamiliar. It’s like working 40 hours a week but only getting paid about $275 for it.)

Please, if what I do means anything to you, become a monthly contributor. It’s like paying for an NYT subscription except you know I’m the only reporter you’re supporting, and you don’t have to debate if you want to continue based on problems stemming from other people’s work in a newsroom. It’s just me and my content! If there’s a problem, you know who to go to, and you know who will respond — and that you’ll actually get a response.

I’ll likely keep updating this website because 1) it’s my portfolio but also 2) I believe in access and I understand if you simply can’t afford to pay. We’re all in this together.

UW tenured professor fired

Trigger warning: sexual harassment and vulgar/racist language included.

In an unprecedented turn of events, the UW fired microbiology professor Michael Katze after two investigations into his misuse of university funds and sexual harassment. He gained tenure at the UW in 2009, a time at which Katze already had numerous complaints against him on record.

Via The Daily

Continue reading

Jayapal leads Seattle town hall rally against Trumpcare


Sen. Pramilla Jayapal answers audience questions about moving forward. (Photo by Kelsey Hamlin)

Town Hall Seattle filled with mostly seniors July 6, gathered together for Congresswoman Pramila Jayapal (D–Wash) as she talked about politicians’ strategies and proposals for America’s new healthcare.

The Republican base vowed to rail against the Affordable Care Act (ACA) before its implementation, quickly renaming it Obamacare in 2010. After that negative political nickname trickled down throughout America, now-President Donald Trump promised to repeal the ACA as soon as he got elected office. Now, seven months into his term, Republicans are still trying to replace it. […]

On July 27, the Senate cast their votes for the last standing Trumpcare bill. Hoards of protestors stood outside of the Washington D.C. Capitol shouting, “don’t kill us, kill the bill!” Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.), Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine), and Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska) voted against repealing Obamacare and against their own party’s wishes. People watching nationwide were nervous because McCain, recently diagnosed with cancer, was speaking out in support of the bill the entire week prior and even after his diagnosis. Without having obtained three more people against the bill on top of many democrats already against it, the legislation would have past. Still, many speculate it is not yet over.


a woman with gold-rimmed glasses stepped on stage. Her name: Leigh Pate. She’s a cancer survivor who finished another round of chemotherapy three weeks prior, due to fallopian tube cancer. Her bills, Pate explained, are already upward $300,000.

Before the ACA, Pate struggled to pay for her necessary medical interventions. She recalled that the ACA “was a tremendous burden lifted.” But that burden wasn’t lifted for too long.

“Two weeks ago, I got a love letter from my insurance company,” Pate said. The paper alerted her to no longer having coverage. She held up the paper.

“I spent the rainy morning at my kitchen table—still sick from having chemo three days before—researching which insurance company might offer me an individual policy.”

She knew losing her insurance meant never getting coverage because of her pre-existing condition: Cancer. Missing a payment meant getting dropped.

“There are people sitting around kitchen tables all around this country who got the same letter as I did,” Pate said. “They’re using their precious energy worrying about their health finances.”

Adrian Laster and Matt Hannah

These photos are for two separate shoots of the people I talked to both times (and every time still) I go to Othello Village, Seattle. One piece already published with South Seattle Emerald uses a handful of these photos, and another will in the near future.

Matt’s shoot: June 27, 2017
Adrian’s shoot: July 8, 2017


Othello Village, Seattle

Even though it took Adrian Laster two years to get a section eight voucher, it typically takes five. Even still, nobody would sublease him because of his non-violent felony charges.