Shaping Capitol Hill Housing’s affordable LGBTQ-focused senior housing project

Capitol Hill Housing hosted its first public discussion Tuesday night with the community it will house in preparation for shaping what it hopes will be the nation’s first LGBTQIA+-focused affordable senior housing at 14th and Union. It just might take a little longer to come up with the money to pay for it.

Via Capitol Hill Seattle Blog

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Capitol Hill Housing project at 14th and Union will create affordable LGBTQ-focused senior housing

True affordability means keeping rents in the city down for everybody. An effort to help Capitol Hill Housing shape “Seattle’s first LGBTQ-affirming affordable senior housing development” at 14th and Union will take another step forward next week with a Community Visioning Workshop.

“We’ve heard consistently from the community about the need for a place where LGBTQ elders in the community could age,” said Ashwin Warrior, Capitol Hill Housing spokesperson. “LGBTQ seniors were also named a priority population for the 2016 Housing Levy which adds extra impetus to the efforts.”

Capitol Hill Housing plans to use the land currently home to a parking lot and upgrade its Helen V Apartments along E Union to create affordable housing for 55-and-up who identify as LGBTQIA+.

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Plans for Africatown Plaza rise at 23rd and Union

Garrett, center, with Forterra’s Michelle Connor and Chris Persons of Capitol Hill Housing (Image: Africatown Plaza)

The newly formed Africatown Community Land Trust entered an agreement with Capitol Hill Housing and Lake Union Partners, the Seattle development company that bought the Midtown Center block in May. The announcement cements the project surrounding Lake Union’s $23.25 million deal to purchase the Central District shopping center land.

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With one last step in design review, hopes for 2018 start of construction for Capitol Hill Station projects

Above the future Capitol Hill Station developments (Image: Alex Garland)

CHS is back in business just in time for the Capitol Hill Station “transit oriented development” projects set to create 400 affordable and market-rate apartment units and 59,000 square feet of commercial and community space along Broadway to finally pass through design review.

Probably.

The four buildings face a second round of review in the design “recommendation” phase Wednesday night.

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UW professor explains the complexity behind Amazon’s HQ2

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While a job boost of 50,000 seems appealing at first glance to any metropolitan city, there’s more to it than meets the eye.

At the beginning of this month, Amazon announced it is scoping for new places to build its second campus. This means cities across the U.S. and Canada are submitting applications and bids.

….

[Jeffrey] Shulman has a “Seattle Growth Podcast” with 13 episodes so far where he interviews Seattle residents, business leaders, and government officials to cover the opportunities and challenges of a city brimming with tech behemoths. Of all his interviews, he most frequently hears about issues with Seattle’s transportation system.

“A lot of people are feeling the crunch that comes with new people getting to work,” Shulman said. Seattle ranks third among the 50 largest U.S. metropolitan areas for the rate of growth for mega-commuters. From 2010 to 2015, census data show the number of 90-minute commuters rose by 72 percent.

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UW creates affordable housing for employees

The UW recently announced it will build 150 to 200 affordable housing units, with priority given to UW faculty and staff, by 2021.

The building stages are just beginning, however. The UW has yet to choose a developer, make design or construction plans, and decide financials. The university has chosen a site: Roosevelt Way Northeast and Northeast 42nd Street, a property they already own. Though tentative, the UW is also looking at housing and services for homeless youth and childcare.

Via The Daily

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What Seattle Can Learn From San Francisco and Chicago In Dealing With Its Housing Affordability Crisis

As Seattle deals with the largest population boom in its history, the Sightline Institute, an independent, nonprofit research and communications center, hosted a panel Wednesday night at the Rainier Arts Center to learn from Chicago and San Francisco affordable housing experts.

via What Seattle Can Learn From San Francisco and Chicago In Dealing With Its Housing Affordability Crisis — South Seattle Emerald