Seattle Could be First in the Nation to Stop Rental Criminal History Discrimination

 

Even though it took Adrian Laster two years to get a Section 8 voucher, it typically takes five. Even still, nobody would sublease him because of his criminal charges. Here, the Seahawks-loving Othello resident holds a folder with all of his paperwork in it. (Photo by Kelsey Hamlin)

 

As it stands, one slice of the criminalization and homelessness cycle could shatter thanks to a Seattle City Council vote set for next week. Seattle would make history, becoming the first city in the nation prohibiting landlords from denying rentals to applicants based on criminal background. […]

via Seattle Could be First in the Nation to Stop Rental Criminal History Discrimination — South Seattle Emerald

Adrian Laster and Matt Hannah

These photos are for two separate shoots of the people I talked to both times (and every time still) I go to Othello Village, Seattle. One piece already published with South Seattle Emerald uses a handful of these photos, and another will in the near future.

Matt’s shoot: June 27, 2017
Adrian’s shoot: July 8, 2017

 

Othello Village, Seattle

Even though it took Adrian Laster two years to get a section eight voucher, it typically takes five. Even still, nobody would sublease him because of his non-violent felony charges.

Mercy Housing’s New Transit-Oriented Complex Already At Capacity

Near the Link light rail’s Othello Station, a passerby can easily spot a new red and grey apartment building called Othello Plaza, seemingly compatible with the other developments directly surrounding it. However, Othello Plaza is considered affordable, received over 2,000 applications and only accepted approximately 100. Othello Plaza is now full, containing […]

via Mercy Housing’s New Transit-Oriented Complex Already At Capacity — South Seattle Emerald

Othello Village Residents Concerned With Seattle’s Shift Away From Transitional Housing

Walk in to the South End’s Othello Village, and you’ll find tiny homes with charming scarecrows perched in little gardens, children, and an open building with a cardboard plaque labeled “security office.”

However, Hannah contended the Othello encampment has far more families than any other place he’s lived, which might explain the stringent rules. Othello’s focus on families and kids is the reason he relocated in the first place, since Hannah has a seven-year-old son named Devyn.

via Othello Village Residents Concerned With Seattle’s Shift Away From Transitional Housing — South Seattle Emerald

Seattle’s Unlikeliest City Council Candidate

His wardrobe is humdrum, his speech informal, and reason for running ad hoc. His name is Eric Smiley. You may have met him at a bus stop or in the tunnel stations, because that’s how he’s trying to compete with the large sums of campaign money backing other councilmember candidates.

But he also just wants to hear what Seattleites are concerned about. There’s one thing distinctly unique about Smiley, however. He is homeless, and has been for three years.

via Seattle’s Unlikeliest City Council Candidate — South Seattle Emerald

Breaking down stigmas on homelessness one conversation at a time

Bolen called homelessness a disease, but that’s not a reason to stereotype. Homelessness impacts people in nearly every aspect of their life, especially the parts many take for granted every day.

“I wanted to take my shoes off and my pants off and just walk around in my underwear,” Bolen said, getting a few laughs from the class as he chuckled himself, “because you don’t have that luxury when you’re homeless.”

via Breaking Down Stigmas On Homelessness One Conversation at a Time — South Seattle Emerald

Conversation on homelessness focuses on Legislature

cathy-you

Dimitri Groce (left), member organizer for WA Low Income Housing Alliance, explains … (Photo by Cathy You)

Approximately 15 people gathered in the University Congregational Church on Wednesday morning to discuss homelessness and mobilization for homeless services and affordable housing.

A very tall man wearing sweats, a black UW sweatshirt, and a beanie sat in the back. He goes by Bryan, and didn’t want to be identified in this article given his current situation.

Bryan just recently became homeless, and is still dealing with the life-altering shock of what that means in his mind. Right now he’s living in the recently moved Tent City 3, which now sits on the UW Seattle campus in parking lot W35. The area can host up to 99 people.

“I’m three weeks in,” Bryan said of being homeless. “It just happened. We had plans, and it fell through last minute.”

He recounted a housing situation that left him and his girlfriend living in a box truck they had bought for moving.

Read more here