After Charlottesville, Right Wing and Counter-Protestors Converge on Westlake

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Arthur Ford continues yelling “Black Lives Matter” in the face of a Proud Boy with the mic. Mario Cater, who raised his fist, remained smiling behind him the whole time. Behind those two one can see Joey Gibson, the organizer. [Photo by Kelsey Hamlin]

In the wake of a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia Saturday, protesters gathered at Denny Park and marched to Westlake in Downtown Seattle yesterday to confront a right wing group called Patriot Prayer. On their way, however, protesters encountered human barricades of police, canisters of pepper spray, and flashbangs.

via After Charlottesville, Right Wing and Counter-Protestors Converge on Westlake — South Seattle Emerald

Election Results: Durkan Poised for General, Moon and Oliver in Tight Race for Second in Mayoral Primary — South Seattle Emerald

Nikkita Oliver (Photo by Alex Garland)

After a months-long mayoral primary campaign where 21 candidates vied to replace the outgoing Ed Murray, Seattleites received a clearer picture of the two candidates competing in November’s general election. With 184,928 ballots counted, former U.S. Attorney Jenny Durkan, widely seen as […]

via Election Results: Durkan Poised for General, Moon and Oliver in Tight Race for Second in Mayoral Primary — South Seattle Emerald

UW tenured professor fired

Trigger warning: sexual harassment and vulgar/racist language included.

In an unprecedented turn of events, the UW fired microbiology professor Michael Katze after two investigations into his misuse of university funds and sexual harassment. He gained tenure at the UW in 2009, a time at which Katze already had numerous complaints against him on record.

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Jayapal leads Seattle town hall rally against Trumpcare

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Sen. Pramilla Jayapal answers audience questions about moving forward. (Photo by Kelsey Hamlin)

Town Hall Seattle filled with mostly seniors July 6, gathered together for Congresswoman Pramila Jayapal (D–Wash) as she talked about politicians’ strategies and proposals for America’s new healthcare.

The Republican base vowed to rail against the Affordable Care Act (ACA) before its implementation, quickly renaming it Obamacare in 2010. After that negative political nickname trickled down throughout America, now-President Donald Trump promised to repeal the ACA as soon as he got elected office. Now, seven months into his term, Republicans are still trying to replace it. […]

On July 27, the Senate cast their votes for the last standing Trumpcare bill. Hoards of protestors stood outside of the Washington D.C. Capitol shouting, “don’t kill us, kill the bill!” Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.), Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine), and Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska) voted against repealing Obamacare and against their own party’s wishes. People watching nationwide were nervous because McCain, recently diagnosed with cancer, was speaking out in support of the bill the entire week prior and even after his diagnosis. Without having obtained three more people against the bill on top of many democrats already against it, the legislation would have past. Still, many speculate it is not yet over.

[…]

a woman with gold-rimmed glasses stepped on stage. Her name: Leigh Pate. She’s a cancer survivor who finished another round of chemotherapy three weeks prior, due to fallopian tube cancer. Her bills, Pate explained, are already upward $300,000.

Before the ACA, Pate struggled to pay for her necessary medical interventions. She recalled that the ACA “was a tremendous burden lifted.” But that burden wasn’t lifted for too long.

“Two weeks ago, I got a love letter from my insurance company,” Pate said. The paper alerted her to no longer having coverage. She held up the paper.

“I spent the rainy morning at my kitchen table—still sick from having chemo three days before—researching which insurance company might offer me an individual policy.”

She knew losing her insurance meant never getting coverage because of her pre-existing condition: Cancer. Missing a payment meant getting dropped.

“There are people sitting around kitchen tables all around this country who got the same letter as I did,” Pate said. “They’re using their precious energy worrying about their health finances.”

Justice4TommyLe hears answers, commitments from officials at community-led forum

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Gabe Nishimura sits with his sign as the event begins. (Photo by Kelsey Hamlin)

Tommy Le was a 20-year-old high schooler shot and killed by King County deputies on June 13 after responding to a disturbance call in Burien. Le was to graduate the next day. Le recently bought a tuxedo for his brother’s wedding, but it had to instead be used for his funeral. The family, due to legal concerns and religious practice, will not be available for interviews for 49 days after his death.

In an effort to get answers for Tommy Le’s family, members of the community organized a forum at Asian Counseling and Referral Service (ACRS) in which officials listened and answered questions. Young Vietnamese Americans were given priority after the family throughout the evening.

King County Sheriff John Urquhart feels officer-involved shootings should never be investigated within their own police department. For Le’s case in particular, Urquhart said he is asking the Federal Bureau of Investigations to take over.

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King County Metro Access Slammed By Audit, Claims of Poor Service

Going out on a limb, parent Becky Bisbee, decided one day to use Access, a $61 million ADA transit program under King County Metro. Her non-verbal and physically disabled daughter was supposed to attend a day camp sponsored by Seattle Parks and Recreation but Bisbee couldn’t get her there. At noon, someone from the day camp called asking if the young girl was coming. This was three hours after Bisbee’s daughter first journeyed to catch the Access van.

Bisbee, recounting this at Tuesday’s King County Council meeting, began to tear up. Deep down in the pit of her stomach, the ghost memory of panic churned.

[…]

Auditors found that, over the past eight years, Transit only billed contractors for half of their missed trips, collecting $97,000 instead of over $250,000. Transit also awarded less than $24,000 incentives which were mostly paid in error. Nearly half of the 29 performance-based payments were paid even though performance standards were not met.

via King County Metro Access Slammed By Audit, Claims of Poor Service — South Seattle Emerald